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New Article: Lessons from History

There is much debate these days amongst people significantly cleverer than myself about the exact nature of time, and indeed whether the past somehow exists alongside the present and future in some sort of gigantic cosmic version of a CD.

Or so it seems to some. Who knows?

Somewhat regrettably, consideration of these fascinating ideas remains largely absent within the hallowed corridors of Charlton Athletic; where presently there seems to be little interest in the past, and not a great deal in the future either, based on recent appointments.

Indeed, our beleaguered CEO has declared effectively that she has no apparent time for the history of CAFC.

Now it may be that her meaning behind this untimely observation has been misconstrued somewhat, or taken in the wrong context ; and I am sure she can correct any misunderstandings perfectly well herself.
But this brusque dismissal of the past prompted me to wonder if the history of CAFC is indeed important or relevant to what this regime is currently aiming for. ( and answers as to what the aim actually is on a postcard please to Baffled of Maidstone)

Now whilst the present is certainly not terribly palatable at CAFC currently, the past and history of the club offers some crumb of comfort and interest to the bewildered supporter.

And it is of course the sense of history about this club (and indeed any other) that is the fundamental factor that unites and compels supporters in their belief and loyalty to the "brand". Supporting Charlton is completely driven and interwoven by a sense of shared history. Fundamental to owning and running a football club should be the understanding that history plays a part in THIS business like few others.

For instance, it is unlikely that the wife and I would trawl through our order history on Amazon and go : " Do you remember when we bought that kettle, dear? I can still see the look on your face when we had our third cuppa in the 92nd minute"

But football fans trawl through their "order history" with their clubs with undying interest and it is no different at Charlton, supporters will tell you the first game they attended, knowing the score, probably the scorer(s) and who had the longest sideburns ( 1-0 Oxford United, er poss Gregory (?) in either category)

They will regularly recall the ups and downs of the fortunes of Charlton Athletic, with teams and games that can both crush and inspire dreams and hopes within minutes of each other.

This club is uniquely tied to its location and home; but the heart of Charlton Athletic beats soundly within its supporters down the generations. Each club has a unique history and it is precisely that past which supporters embrace, and which keeps them returning. And I would suggest it is especially true at Charlton.

Football support is an overwhelmingly emotive exercise, not often embedded in too much rationality which is probably much as it should be. We can forgive shocking performances, missed open goals as much as we can celebrate skill, glory and passion for the cause.

That is what it is all about. Those moments in history. We can get over the disappointments.

Eventually.

What we are less likely to accept is a disregard for who we are and how we got here.

I would suggest that it would be a mistake to ignore or downgrade the past of this club. It IS the club and arguably it still remains the way forward.

Comments

  • And if you know your history it's enough to make your heart go whoooooooooooah.......
  • *cleverer

    ;-)
  • Chizz said:

    *cleverer

    ;-)

    Thanks, see what I mean ;-)
  • Enjoyed reading that 3blokes. Particularly on this sad day in Charlton's history with the fans protest planned at the Valley.
  • It would've been Alan Campbell, for both categories!
  • 3blokes said:

    There is much debate these days amongst people significantly cleverer than myself about the exact nature of time, and indeed whether the past somehow exists alongside the present and future in some sort of gigantic cosmic version of a CD.

    Or so it seems to some. Who knows?

    Somewhat regrettably, consideration of these fascinating ideas remains largely absent within the hallowed corridors of Charlton Athletic; where presently there seems to be little interest in the past, and not a great deal in the future either, based on recent appointments.

    Indeed, our beleaguered CEO has declared effectively that she has no apparent time for the history of CAFC.

    Now it may be that her meaning behind this untimely observation has been misconstrued somewhat, or taken in the wrong context ; and I am sure she can correct any misunderstandings perfectly well herself.
    But this brusque dismissal of the past prompted me to wonder if the history of CAFC is indeed important or relevant to what this regime is currently aiming for. ( and answers as to what the aim actually is on a postcard please to Baffled of Maidstone)

    Now whilst the present is certainly not terribly palatable at CAFC currently, the past and history of the club offers some crumb of comfort and interest to the bewildered supporter.

    And it is of course the sense of history about this club (and indeed any other) that is the fundamental factor that unites and compels supporters in their belief and loyalty to the "brand". Supporting Charlton is completely driven and interwoven by a sense of shared history. Fundamental to owning and running a football club should be the understanding that history plays a part in THIS business like few others.

    For instance, it is unlikely that the wife and I would trawl through our order history on Amazon and go : " Do you remember when we bought that kettle, dear? I can still see the look on your face when we had our third cuppa in the 92nd minute"

    But football fans trawl through their "order history" with their clubs with undying interest and it is no different at Charlton, supporters will tell you the first game they attended, knowing the score, probably the scorer(s) and who had the longest sideburns ( 1-0 Oxford United, er poss Gregory (?) in either category)

    They will regularly recall the ups and downs of the fortunes of Charlton Athletic, with teams and games that can both crush and inspire dreams and hopes within minutes of each other.

    This club is uniquely tied to its location and home; but the heart of Charlton Athletic beats soundly within its supporters down the generations. Each club has a unique history and it is precisely that past which supporters embrace, and which keeps them returning. And I would suggest it is especially true at Charlton.

    Football support is an overwhelmingly emotive exercise, not often embedded in too much rationality which is probably much as it should be. We can forgive shocking performances, missed open goals as much as we can celebrate skill, glory and passion for the cause.

    That is what it is all about. Those moments in history. We can get over the disappointments.

    Eventually.

    What we are less likely to accept is a disregard for who we are and how we got here.

    I would suggest that it would be a mistake to ignore or downgrade the past of this club. It IS the club and arguably it still remains the way forward.

    Our history has shaped who we are and therefore the very culture of our club.

    I think it's sensible to consider that cultural change is needed for the club to progress, but cultural change needs the buy in of those you're changing. And it's evolutionary, not something that can be achieved overnight. Success is also heavily dependent on communication.

    I'm proud of our history.
  • 10/10 Jon and go to the top of the class. ;)
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  • “When the situation was manageable it was neglected, and now that it is thoroughly out of hand we apply too late the remedies which then might have effected a cure. There is nothing new in the story. It is as old as the sibylline books. It falls into that long, dismal catalogue of the fruitlessness of experience and the confirmed unteachability of mankind. Want of foresight, unwillingness to act when action would be simple and effective, lack of clear thinking, confusion of counsel until the emergency comes, until self-preservation strikes its jarring gong–these are the features which constitute the endless repetition of history.”
  • Addickted said:

    “When the situation was manageable it was neglected, and now that it is thoroughly out of hand we apply too late the remedies which then might have effected a cure. There is nothing new in the story. It is as old as the sibylline books. It falls into that long, dismal catalogue of the fruitlessness of experience and the confirmed unteachability of mankind. Want of foresight, unwillingness to act when action would be simple and effective, lack of clear thinking, confusion of counsel until the emergency comes, until self-preservation strikes its jarring gong–these are the features which constitute the endless repetition of history.”

    Who's quote Addickted?
  • Addickted said:

    “When the situation was manageable it was neglected, and now that it is thoroughly out of hand we apply too late the remedies which then might have effected a cure. There is nothing new in the story. It is as old as the sibylline books. It falls into that long, dismal catalogue of the fruitlessness of experience and the confirmed unteachability of mankind. Want of foresight, unwillingness to act when action would be simple and effective, lack of clear thinking, confusion of counsel until the emergency comes, until self-preservation strikes its jarring gong–these are the features which constitute the endless repetition of history.”

    Who's quote Addickted?
    Churchill of course!
  • Addickted said:

    Addickted said:

    “When the situation was manageable it was neglected, and now that it is thoroughly out of hand we apply too late the remedies which then might have effected a cure. There is nothing new in the story. It is as old as the sibylline books. It falls into that long, dismal catalogue of the fruitlessness of experience and the confirmed unteachability of mankind. Want of foresight, unwillingness to act when action would be simple and effective, lack of clear thinking, confusion of counsel until the emergency comes, until self-preservation strikes its jarring gong–these are the features which constitute the endless repetition of history.”

    Who's quote Addickted?
    Churchill of course!
    And what did he ever achieve?
  • wickford said:

    Addickted said:

    Addickted said:

    “When the situation was manageable it was neglected, and now that it is thoroughly out of hand we apply too late the remedies which then might have effected a cure. There is nothing new in the story. It is as old as the sibylline books. It falls into that long, dismal catalogue of the fruitlessness of experience and the confirmed unteachability of mankind. Want of foresight, unwillingness to act when action would be simple and effective, lack of clear thinking, confusion of counsel until the emergency comes, until self-preservation strikes its jarring gong–these are the features which constitute the endless repetition of history.”

    Who's quote Addickted?
    Churchill of course!
    And what did he ever achieve?
    Bring car insurance down a few quid..??
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